Primary Ethics Bites! – alternative

Primary Ethics is proud to have offered an online alternative to ethics classes in school. Due to students returning to learning at school, we recognise the need to support families at home is no longer critical, even though ethics is not currently being delivered in schools. We are reviewing all of our Bites and are considering how we offer Bites in the future.

Primary Ethics Bites

Bites is our series of specially designed bite-sized lessons for students to chew over at home, practising their skills in close listening and ethical reasoning, based on material from our curriculum. Bites for the K-2 age group are designed for students to tackle individually, with one or more family members, assisted by an adult. Bites for Years 3-6 are designed for students to work on individually or with a family group. An adult learning supervisor may like to take part by helping read the stories and questions and helping students think for themselves about the dilemma we pose. Each Bite takes approximately 10 to 15 minutes to complete.

You will see last week’s Bites posted immediately below. Scroll down further to see Bites posted in previous weeks.

Last Week

years K – 2

Please can we keep her Dad?

 

This Bite challenges students to think about the needs and appropriate treatment of wild animals and pets.

Years 3 – 6

Do family and friends come first?

 

This Bite encourages students to consider whether they have good reasons to do more for their family and friends than for other people.

 Previous Weeks

 years K – 2

How much should the pig get?

 

This Bite encourages students to think about what it means to treat people fairly and to reflect on the rule of strict equality.

When is it okay to be proud?

 

This Bite asks students to wonder whether they have any right to be proud of themselves and, if they do, on what basis.

Can we be sure?

 

This Bite asks students to make their best guesses, when they don’t have all the information they need to be sure.

Is it important to be brave?

 

This Bite encourages students to think for themselves about the nature and importance of courage.

have you ever been called lazy?

 

This Bite asks students to think about laziness and whether it is bad to be lazy.

No way! what animals do that?

 

This Bite encourages students to think for themselves about whether it is important to be able to give examples and counter-examples.

should neo tell on his sister?

 

This Bite asks students to think about whether or not to tell on someone.

why did neo tell a lie?

 

This Bite asks students to think about making a mistake and making up a story about what happened, rather than telling the truth.

should we blame the donkey?

 

This Bite encourages students to think about the difference between meaning or intending to cause harm and causing harm accidentally.

Should i share my pizza?

 

This Bite invites students to begin to think about what constitutes a person’s identity over time.

When Harry met Harley

 

This Bite invites students to begin to think about what constitutes a person’s identity over time.

What a whale might know

 

This Bite asks students to consider whether animals sometimes mean to do the things they do, and the role knowledge plays in forming intentions.

Should Kalayla forgive Arly?

 

This Bite asks students to think about whether when someone does something to hurt us, it is important to be open to forgiving them.

Years 3 – 6

Keep Out!

 

This Bite asks students to think about what it is to be selfish and why some people are selfish.

Who should get the garden?

 

This Bite challenges students to think about how to balance the conflicting interests of animals and people.

Accident or on purpose?

 

This Bite invites students to think about the extent to which we can be held morally responsible for our decisions and actions.

Do you really have a choice?

 

This Bite invites students to think about the extent to which we can be held morally responsible for our decisions and actions.

Is it okay to keep animals in zoos?

 

This Bite asks students to evaluate arguments for and against keeping animals in captivity and their understanding of what makes a good reason.

No put downs please!

 

This Bite invites students to think about disagreement and the distinction between respectful and disrespectful disagreement.

Is it ever okay to boast?

 

This Bite encourages students to think about what it is to boast and what, if anything, makes it wrong.

The rule’s the rule. Is that okay?

 

This Bite encourages students to think about some of the challenges involved in thinking for themselves and standing up for what is right.

The right to life and liberty

 

This Bite asks students to consider the notion of human rights and whether some rights should be extended to other animals.

Can a belief be dangerous?

 

This Bite invites students to think about respecting the beliefs of others and understanding the distinction between tolerance and respect.

Put yourself in Sahir’s shoes

 

This Bite develops students’ capacity to understand others’ feelings, focusing on children who are child labourers.

Who’s flying this plane?

 

This Bite invites students to consider the notion of Fatalism – the idea that our futures are fixed and that whatever we do, we cannot change them.

How come it’s different for Oki?

 

This Bite challenges students to understand that common moral principles or values can underlie quite different sets of moral rules.